Adar
 

Power Pieces

Amerjit Ghag, owner of CHAI Studio located at Ward Warehouse recently got back to Hawai‘i from a buying trip to India. Ghag has returned with, among other things, a selection of handmade, one-of-a-kind jewelry pieces made by nomadic, Afghani peoples who use found items and nearby resources to create these versatile and stunning necklace pendants

Amerjit Ghag, owner of CHAI Studio located at Ward Warehouse recently got back to Hawai‘i from a buying trip to India. Ghag has returned with, among other things, a selection of handmade, one-of-a-kind jewelry pieces made by nomadic, Afghani peoples who use found items and nearby resources to create these versatile and stunning necklace pendants. (Read more about Ghag in “Serenity Now” in the June/July issue of HILuxury Magazine.)

 HILuxury HQ: What are some of the special energies that the pendants/necklaces hold? 

Amerjit Ghag: First and foremost the pendants hold the energy of whoever created it and whomever wore it before. Traditionally these pieces were made for brides, so I imagine the parents of the bride commissioning the piece with their favored artisan, so there is the love. Then the artisan working on each piece, planning and creating, using available resources, sometimes melting down another piece in order to create this one, so there is creativity and ingenuity. Then the bride first wearing the piece at her wedding so there is happiness.

HQ: What are your favorite pieces (which stones)? 

AG: Adar is one of my favorite pieces. It was originally a set of earrings. I discovered it as just one piece and thought it would make a great pendant. The wire that goes through the ear, I had wrapped in order to stabilize it and then selected lapis lazuli beads for stringing. I thought Lapis was appropriate, as it is mined in Afghanistan and considered protection from the evil eye in those parts. Lapis activates the 3rd eye chakra which helps focus. As a child, I was always fascinated by my grandmother’s meditation mala, so these are strung in the same fashion. There is a knot between each bead and there is a tassel which is considered the symbol of a thousand lotus petals. Mind you, her mala was an inspiration, so these don’t necessarily comply with the 108 bead requirement of a traditional meditation mala.

HQ: How did you discover these “Gypsy-fusion” pieces?

AG: I first discovered the Afghan pieces about 2 years ago, while working with my block printer in India. After we finished our textile planning, he asked “Madam, may I show you some special jewelry?” Of course I said yes! He brought out a dirty cloth bundle, untied it and there was a small pile of old jewelry pieces and parts. Not knowing what I was going to do with them, I selected a half dozen. That afternoon, I stumbled into a bead shop and started chatting with the owner. In a manner of minutes we were having a cup of chai and I was sketching on a napkin his beads (semi precious stones) and my new treasures combined into mala pendants, inspired by my grandmother.

CHAI Studio, Ward Warehouse, 1050 Ala Moana Blvd., (808) 536-4543, www.chai-studio.com

Images courtesy CHAI Studio

Images courtesy CHAI Studio

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